BACKGROUND

Kansas City Eviction Project is a collaborative effort involving researchers, community organizers, neighborhood leaders, lawyers, and policymakers. Eviction is our entry point to understanding housing injustice in Kansas City. As Matthew Desmond determines in his Pulitzer Prize winning book Evicted, eviction is both a cause and a condition of poverty. Though property ownership, vacancies, and evictions are part of the public record, the associated data are not systematically compiled and analyzed. Desmond, who studied eviction in Milwaukee, calls eviction "the most understudied process contributing to the reproduction of urban poverty." 

DATA AND METHODS

We are working with one of the richest datasets on eviction in the country. We compiled 182,992 eviction filings, spanning 18 years, drawn from the Jackson County Landlord-Tenant court records. The data are at the address-level and have been geocoded and mapped. 

KEY FINDINGS

EVICTIONS FILED (1999-2016)

 Over the study period, an average of 42 formal evictions were filed per business day. Evictions were filed in relatively consistent numbers, year over year, suggesting that there could be a core of landlords in the city who rely on eviction as a part of their business models.

Over the study period, an average of 42 formal evictions were filed per business day. Evictions were filed in relatively consistent numbers, year over year, suggesting that there could be a core of landlords in the city who rely on eviction as a part of their business models.

EVICTIONS FILED PER SQUARE MILE (1999-2016)

 Evictions have been spatially concentrated in the city’s poorest neighborhoods—but their impact is spreading to other parts of town, consistent with development trends.

Evictions have been spatially concentrated in the city’s poorest neighborhoods—but their impact is spreading to other parts of town, consistent with development trends.

EVICTIONS FILED vs. Black Population (1999-2016) 

 Black people living in poverty were disproportionately impacted by eviction during the study period. We performed a multivariate analysis that showed that race is the most important factor that predicts whether or not someone will be evicted in Kansas City, even when we hold income constant. 

Black people living in poverty were disproportionately impacted by eviction during the study period. We performed a multivariate analysis that showed that race is the most important factor that predicts whether or not someone will be evicted in Kansas City, even when we hold income constant.